NEWSPAPER ANALYSIS : LAYOUT, ELEMENTS, STYLE

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How to Analyze a News Article

http://www.ehow.com/print/how_7361592_analyze-news-article.html

Worksheet for Analysis of a Newspaper Article    

http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/educationoutreach/worksheet_newspaperarticle.pdf

newspaper layout elements

http://www.scribd.com/doc/31407922/Newspaper-Layout-Presentation

Tabloid (newspaper format)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabloid_(newspaper_format)

The Sounds of Silence – silent letters in English words

Oxford University Press

Silence sign Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Ian Brookes is a freelance writer and editor based in Scotland. He has edited a number of dictionaries and has written books about spelling, writing, and punctuation. In this post, he looks at the presence of silent letters in English words and the problems they cause for spelling.

Learning to speak another language is hard enough, but students of English have to deal with further issues when they come to the written form of the language, and they soon find that English words do not always look exactly how they sound. In a previous post I looked at the presence of double letters in some words as one of the causes of spelling difficulty. In this post I will look at another: the presence of ‘silent’ letters in some words.

Why should knot be spelt with a ‘k’ when it is pronounced the same as

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Five Fascinating Facts about James Joyce

Interesting Literature

1. James Joyce was born in the same year as another notable modernist writer, Virginia Woolf.  But the similarities don’t end there. Both were born in 1882, but both writers also died in the same year, 1941. Both wrote landmark modernist novels, published in the 1920s, whose principal action takes place over just one day in mid-June (the novels in question are  Ulysses  and  Mrs Dalloway ). Both pioneered the stream of consciousness technique associated with modernist writing.

2. James Joyce was scared of thunder and lightning. Joyce’s fear of thunder and lightning – the technical name for which is astraphobia – stems from his childhood, when his fervently Catholic governess told him that thunderstorms were God manifesting his anger. This fear stayed with Joyce into adulthood. It even probably helped to inspire a 100-letter word which Joyce coined in his final novel, Finnegans Wake (1939), Bababadalgharaghtakamminapronnkonnbronntonnepronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordeenenthurnuk, which appears on the first…

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